It’s my birthday!

My WordPress birthday that is – one year ago today I entered the blogosphere so it’s true what they say: time flies when you’re having fun!

Anyway in that time I have had many many views and have many many followers so thank you to all of you who have dropped by and huge thanks and a hug to those of you who’ve visited more than once.

But according to my stats the most common search terms used to find my blog all relate to the tube so I thought I’d write some of my thoughts on the wonderful London Underground and how it is reading on the different lines. I’m also going to give them a score out of 5 for readability.

Bakerloo

A definite oldie, you can feel the springs in every seat and there’s a nice feel to it that’s like going back in time. Buuut the seats don’t have arms between them so you can end up sat far too close to the person next to you and there’s no elbow purchase which is essential for holding a book at the right height. 2/5

Central

I always think of the Central line as being a horrible, sweaty, smelly line and I avoid it wherever possible but that’s not actually the case anymore. It got done up for the Olympics and it’s actually quite nice now but it’s also not got any arms to its seats removing that necessary elbow rest. 2/5

What is this lack of arm rests about??

What is this lack of arm rests about??

Circle

More missing elbow rests, a no longer easy to navigate route and an inevitable crowd of revellers on “the circle line pub crawl” coupled with a confusing mix of sometimes overground, sometimes underground stations make the Circle line far from ideal reading territory. 1/5

District

Never, ever, ever try reading on the District line! Not only is it old and rattley with a confusing system of lines that may or may not call at the station you want but you’ll be lucky if the right train comes within 10 minutes (that’s long by LU standards) AND the lights go on and off! So one minute you’re happily reading and the next you’re in darkness. 0/5

DLR

This is more of a monorail than an Underground line and as such delivers numerous reading distractions. Seeing the great outdoors is far too exciting for a mole like me to focus on a book – why do you think I never get the bus?! 2/5

Hammersmith & City

It’s got funky seat covers and an arm rest every other chair and it’s got plenty of space for standers which make it easier when forced to stand. An indifferent 2.5/5

Funkaay

Funkaay

Jubilee

My favourite line for reading has to be the Jubilee line. It’s slick and smooth with trains that glide along – no jolting making you lose your place and doors that quite literally sigh as they open giving you a feeling of contentment. Delightful. 5/5

Metropolitan

This is another one that’s always nicer than I think, it suffers from being lumped together with the H&C and the Circle lines. But it does have seats arranged in fours (like on a train) so there’s the constant worry of kicking someone and the awkward shuffle when a new person sits down that can distract from the written word. 3.5/5

Northern

Ahh the Northern line. My line of choice, it’s not the smartest or the quickest nor is it the coolest (I’m talking temperature there) but it’s solid and dependable, it runs through snow and strike ensuring that you won’t have to go without your reading. 5/5

It's like a little piece of home

It’s like a little piece of home

Piccadilly

A bit dingy this one and quite noisy as well. It’s also the coldest of the lines and usually means reading in a coat which is quite restrictive in terms of arm movement and ease of page turning. 3/5

Victoria

Another excellent choice, it tends to be cool thanks to well-maintained air conditioning and it is also a smooth ride. Ample room on the seats and if you sit at the extreme end of the train it’s usually fairly empty so no need to fight for elbow room. 5/5

Waterloo & City

I’ll be honest I’ve caught the Waterloo & City line twice at most (it has two stops, what use is that?) so I don’t really have an opinion, it connects Bank and Waterloo though so I imagine it to be fairly swish and used to accommodating rich bankers who don’t need to live in London…

I hope you have found this account to be informative and now have a better idea of what it’s like reading on the grand ole London Underground. And also since the most common term for finding this blog actually relates to the tube map here it is as it would look at street level:

real tube map

Advertisements

4 responses to “It’s my birthday!

  1. Ahhh, the Northern Line rated highly! When I lived in London, the northern line was my favourite way to get home (it’s also my favourite way to “get lost” and to “accidentally” end up in Camden!

  2. Happy blogging birthday (I’m belated but I’m here, LOL!) This was such a great idea of how to celebrate it, hearing you talk about all the different tubes was really interesting!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s